Nancy Malnik

Wishes Do Come True!

Posted by Alvin Malnik on July 05, 2016
Alvin Malnik Work, Charity Events / No Comments

Each autumn in Miami, a gala for the best cause we can think of brings in the likes of local and A-list celebrities for one reason and one reason alone—the children. This year, the Intercontinental Miami Make-A-Wish ball celebrates with yet another event for the most-noble cause. Held at The InterContinental Miami Hotel on November 2, this year’s theme is named “magic,” so be prepared to expect the unexpected, as well as a performance by Adam Lambert. And while you’re dressed your best and sipping champagne, keep in mind that this isn’t just a party, it’s a party with a purpose.

18th Annual Make-A-Wish Ball – 2012

“Make-A-Wish is an opportunity to give. Putting a smile on the face of children with life-threatening illness is all-satisfying,” explains Shareef Malnik, whose family has been involved with the charity for 19 years. “My parents, Nancy and Al Malnik, became lifetime benefactors of the InterContinental Miami Make-A-Wish Ball. Nine years ago, they, along with former President, CEO and Founder of Make-A-Wish Nancy Strong, asked me to become Chairman. I have been Chairman now for nine years and two years ago I joined the Board of Directors, as well.”

Wishes do come true 2

As a member of the board, Malnik and his family go the extra mile to ensure Make-A-Wish stands out from other charity events. At the top of their priorities is entertainment. “Although our first goal is to raise as much money for the children as possible, it is condition upon the guests enjoying their evening. If people are entertained, they will come back. In the long run, with that philosophy and strategy, we will grant more wishes,” he explains.

Over the past nine years, the wish fund has increased from $300,000 to $1,700,000 net proceeds. All of which goes toward kids with a dream. “This is as a result of charitable contributions from a lot of great people that want to help children,” Malnik says.  Wishes do come true 3- Al Malnik

Aiding in drawing in those funds is the event’s celebrity-filled guest list. This year, attendees include, Lambert, Gabrielle Anwar as the celebrity auctioneer,Flo Rida, Miami Housewives and Miami Heat players will all be saying cheers in the name of charity.

Al Manik with Kim Kardashian WestOver the last few years, stars like Anwar, Melanie Amaro, Paula Abdul, Sharon Stone, Kim Kardashian, Pamela Anderson, Venus and Serena Williams and so many more have shown support for the event. Some of these celebs made last year’s event the most memorable by far for Malnik. “Last year’s ball stands out for several reasons: Gabrielle [Anwar] knocked the ball out of the park with the auction. We raised more money than ever before. And I was forced into a pair of ballet tights in order to offer comedic relief for the audience.”

Malnik is always willing to go that extra mile to ensure the gala is a success. “Each year my goal is to beat last year, in terms of money raised and entertainment level to guests,” Malnik says.

He applies this same philosophy to the after party as well. Now in its sixth year, the event features DJs and a fashion show by Heatherette designer Traver Rains.Al Malnik, Shareef Malnik, and Paula Abdul

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Alvin Malnik is Making Magic Happen

Posted by Alvin Malnik on July 05, 2016
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The Southern Florida Make-a-Wish Foundation chapter has granted more than 10,000 wishes to children, making it one of the most successful chapters in the world.

The Make-a-Wish Foundation grew out of the former Arizona highway patrol officer’s effort to grant the wish of a seven-year-old boy with leukemia. The boy wanted to be a highway patrol motorcycle officer, which was in 1980. Unfortunately, the boy died a few days after receiving his wish. However, the impact of how joyful the simple act had made the child stuck with Shankwitz.

Since its inception, Make-a-Wish has granted well over 300,000 wishes. In an interview about him receiving the Medal of Honor, Shankwitz told a news reporter: “There’s a wish granted somewhere in the world every 26 minutes, all because of one little boy.”

Alvin Malnik Making Magic HappenThe South Florida chapter of Make-a-Wish is one of the most robust and grants a wish to children with life-threatening medical diseases every 16 hours. Since the start of the chapter in 1983, more than 10,000 children have received wishes in the area that Make-a-Wish serves. The Southern Florida chapter covers 13 counties in Florida and also the U.S. Virgin Islands.
The president and CEO of the Southern Florida chapter, Norman Wedderburn, says there are three requirements for a child to be eligible to have a wish granted.

“We determine a child’s medical eligibility with the help of a treating physician. To receive a wish, the child must be diagnosed with a life-threatening medical condition. Children, who have reached the age of 2½ and are under the age of 18 at the time of referral, may be eligible for a wish. The wish can take place after the 18th birthday, but the child needed to be referred prior to that date. And a child may not have received a wish from another wish-granting organization. After all this has been determined, we make it happen.”

While many believe a child must be terminally ill to be eligible for a wish, that is not the case.

So in its more than 30 years of making dreams come true, you probably want to know some of the wishes that the chapter has granted.

“It’s been everything from tree houses to a recent one — a synthetic ice skating rink. Our children have met presidents; two children met the Pope; a child met the first lady; they’ve requested and met every celebrity you could imagine from Taylor Swift to the Jonas Brothers. We had one young girl who waited a number of years to meet Paul McCartney.”

One of the Southern Florida chapter’s “Wish” kids wanted to be in a Broadway play and Norm recalls, “we were able to get her a cameo on Broadway in the musical Wicked.” Another child wanted to be in a James Bond movie — “that was a while back,” Norm states.

Children’s wishes usually fall into four categories: “I wish to be” (something), “I wish to meet” (someone), “I wish to go” (somewhere), and “I wish to have” (something). Families are always encouraged and welcomed to participate in the experience of wish making. What is the average cost of a wish? $5,000, according to foundation statistics.

“We’ve given a number of children horses, musical equipment, such as pianos. And then there are some that I will call ‘unique’ — a young man wanted to ring the bell to close the stock exchange. And he did.”
Wishes, Wedderburn says, are as large and as wide as the imagination of the children. The foundation’s “wish granters” are volunteers who have the job to explore the imagination and go into the home of the child.

“They might really want to go to Disney World because that’s what they think is the top, but it might be More Alvin Malnik Making Magic Happensomething different once you start talking to them.”

The volunteers ark the children to come up with 12 potential wishes. “We then narrow it down with the child so that we can really grant the child’s ‘No. 1’ heartfelt wish.”

Wedderburn, who gave up practicing law to become the head of the non-profit group, has been the CEO of the Southern Florida chapter for the past 10 years. Wedderburn joined as a board member in 1998 after another lawyer introduced him to the organization. Wedderburn got so involved, he says, he sold his interest in his law practice to work for the organization full time.

“What’s special about Make-a-Wish,” he says, is that we can show donors the child their contribution impacted and exactly what they’ve done with their money, and that’s a really rare thing in the world of non-profits. Other organizations do incredible things, but you aren’t always aware of the impact your money is having on individuals. If you walk into my office, the walls are lined with pictures of ‘wish’ children that I have personally underwritten their wish. I know who they are, their disease, and where the dollars went.”

Make-a-Wish does not receive any state or federal funding, and all of the money to grant wishes is raised through corporate sponsorships, special events, foundation grants, and individual contributions.

While Wedderburn is proud that his chapter granted more wishes last year than all but three of the other 62 chapters in the world, he says there’s never a time to let the magic wand rest for even a second.

“While we are happy about the children we have reached, our goal is always to reach every eligible child in our community. Yes, we take a moment to celebrate our successes, but then we realize that there is still a lot of work to be done.”

Couple for a Cause

Shareef Malnik cast a spell over his soon-to-be-wife, Gabrielle Anwar with the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Prior to meeting her fiancé, the Burn Notice actress had her own charities that she supported, but his dedication to Make-a-Wish now has her in a solid and recurring role. She’s going on her fourth year at the annual Wishmaker’s Ball at the InterContinental Miami as celebrity auctioneer, which this year is set for Saturday, Nov. 7.

There is no doubt about Malnik’s strong impact on the annual charity, which is a Greek mythology theme this year. “Something that she conjured up,” Malnik is shares during our interview.

“He’s so involved in the behind-the-scenes and making sure it’s a success, and every now and then I pipe up with an idea and I do it in a way that he has to listen,” Anwar jokes. “As it gets towards the night of the ball, we start rehearsing some of the ideas we’ve batted around for a few months.”

The couple’s extravagant ideas have become one of those “what will they do next?” highlights of the evening. You almost want to be a fly on the wall after listening to the two of them talk about their participation, their plans, and what surprises they have in store for this year’s event.

“Yes, we’ve had people say that to us before,” says Anwar, which is precisely why there is gag reel on YouTube of the couple “rehearsing” at the Miami City Ballet for the 2012 ball. This is where they led the crowd in a Bollywood-inspired dance to the music of “Jai Ho,” from the movie Slumdog Millionaire.

“She whipped me into shape to dance in front of the crowd, and it was a good eight weeks,” says Malnik. “Eight weeks to get me to look at least okay next to her — a professional dancer.”

“Last year, it was the Wizard of Oz theme; I played the wizard and was hiding underneath her dress. The year before I got to saw her in half, which was definitely my idea.”

All joking aside, Anwar speaks of her celebrity auctioneer role, which she says, she was tentative to take on because “I didn’t want to try to fill Paula Abdul’s shoes, even though they are tiny.” Abdul had been the celebrity auctioneer at 2010’s ball and the first ball Anwar had attended with Malnik.
In her role as auctioneer, she says, “You have to inspire the spending of money, which is sometimes difficult to inspire, I’ve recently learned. But hopefully, Shareef and I come up with an idea every year that is going to be humorous, instill some emotion, and eventually lead to generosity. It’s really not an easy combo,” she reveals.

Malnik, who owns the legendary Miami Beach steakhouse, The Forge, became the chairman of the gala in 2004. “I made an observation, not realizing that it would lead to me becoming chairman. I thought that the direction the ball was going had a limited life — even though it was a sold-out event.” Since he has taken over as chairman, the ball’s profits have gone from $300,000 to $2.5 million last year.

So what’s his secret? “I think first and foremost, you have to spend money to make money. That old idea that a charity should try to get everything for free, and they can be as lean as possible — you end up making less money. And the goal for me here is the wishes. What will it take for me to get the most possible wishes out of the ball? What does it take to get people to want to spend money at the ball and to develop incentives so that they want to keep coming back?”

Shareef’s father, Al Malnik, is a lifetime benefactor of the Make-A-Wish Foundation. At the 2012 gala, Al announced a $1-million donation to the charity to establish the Malnik Family Wish Fund. The contribution is intended to grant wishes “in perpetuity” to children suffering from life-threatening diseases.

“I had been around Make-a-Wish because of my father; it was the late Nancy Strom, a founder of the Southern Florida chapter, who asked me to get involved as chairman. And the more I became involved, the more it became part of my DNA,” says Shareef.

Soon after taking on the roll of chairman, his younger brother, Jarod – 6 at the time – was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia, AML.

“He became eligible for a wish,” recalls Malnik. The wish Jarod got granted was to throw a strike over home plate at Fenway Park in a Red Sox game. He was able to do it and received a standing ovation from the crowd. Jarod is 16 years old and cancer free today.

“I think this happening to my family gave me more empathy for the wish families and reinforced my commitment to Make-a-Wish,” says the charity ball chairman.

While Malnik had first-hand experience, CEO Norman Wedderburn says the signature event serves a very important introductory purpose. As a main fundraising sources for Make-a-Wish Southern Florida chapter, the event is key to help “get a group of people who don’t naturally wake up one day and think about helping an organization that has not impacted their life. This gala has been used to really build awareness about the foundation and from there, get the kind of support that nurtures lifetime support. That’s the real secret in the sauce.”

Malnik adds: “It’s such a positive charity. You’re making people feel good today, as opposed to hoping that the money you give will help someone feel good some day in the future.”

Speaking of wishes, Malnik and Anwar are set to be married by the time the Wishmaker’s Ball. Dating since 2010, they’ve picked Labor Day weekend to exchange their vows.

My Wish: A Story

By Ian Sallee

”I’d like to tell you my story about my cantankerous and cancerous adventure that began when I was 16 years old. I am happy to report now, however, that I am 21 and have nearly five years of cancer-free scans under my belt.

The story began in 2010 when I was participating in a drama competition in Tampa. I was sick for most of the trip — so ill that I ended up not being able to compete, let alone leave the hotel room.

A few days later, when I returned home to Miami, I felt a bit better. But as the months wore on, I continued to have a pesky cough. For the summer months, I worked as a camp counselor, but two weeks into the job, I was sick again. I went to my family doctor. His diagnosis was that I had a bacterial infection.

I kept feeling sicker and sicker. It got so bad one day that I decided an emergency room visit was in order. They suggested a chest X-ray. What was revealed was a mass that had grown larger than my heart, located on my thymus gland, smack dab in the middle of my trachea. After a slew of tests, it was discovered to be mediastinal B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. I was admitted to the hospital where I stayed for a little over two weeks. There were surgical procedures — then chemotherapy.

Dealing with cancer was the greatest hurdle of my life, but there were good experiences I didn’t even know existed, however, on the other side. I learned from hospital workers that because of my medical condition and my age, I was eligible for Make-a-Wish. It was one of sweetest things that occurred during this difficult time. And it gave me something incredibly special to look forward to — that when I finally got healthy, I would be able to, perhaps, have a wish come true. It was also a great opportunity for my family, who because of limited income, would also get the chance to do something unforgettable with me.

The road to my Make-a-Wish began after speaking with social workers in my oncology office. They told me to “dream big” since this was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I didn’t only dream big, I dreamt “huge.” Over the next four years, I created a laundry list of wishes that included — but weren’t limited to — a trip to Uganda to track a family of gorillas, an Antarctic cruise, a chance to meet Nelson Mandela, and to be knighted by the Queen of England. And those were just the wishes I shared with Make-a-Wish.

I was determined to make sure that if the aforementioned wishes didn’t work out, something within the realm of possibility would come to fruition. It dawned on me that traveling was it — that was something that was in my heart to do. Since my family would be joining me, I wondered where I should go. Italy! I could spend quality time with my family, experience a new and different place, and learn about another culture.

When four years of treatment was finally over and my biopsy was negative for the lymphoma, I could finally fulfill my “wish.” I was going to Italy. The Make-a-Wish trip turned out to be one of the most enchanting and unforgettable experiences of my life, to date.

We ate delicious Italian meals, saw ancient and modern art, explored the streets, and bought mementos and souvenirs — normal tourist stuff. We visited Ischia, a volcanic island paradise that looked like a postcard. We traveled to the ruins of Pompeii and climbed to the top of Mount Vesuvius. We had a private tour of Rome and the Vatican. We climbed the Spanish Steps and on to the Coliseum. All of these experiences were astonishing, but more than that, I was grateful for the chance to be doing something special that most people would not have the opportunity to experience.”

The Make-a-Wish Foundation truly makes a difference in these children’s lives. Whether they send a toddler to Walt Disney World or a 20-year-old to Italy, what Make-a-Wish does for children with life-threatening medical conditions is provide them something to look forward to on the other side of difficult times when they are struggling with disease.

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Nice rich people at the Malnik crib – Make A Wish Party

Posted by Alvin Malnik on June 23, 2009
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by Jose Labiet – Page 2 Live

With the great unwashed frolicking on the beach below, philanthropist Al Malnik had nearly 200 swells at his palatial Ocean Ridge digs for a Sunday afternoon party to benefit his pet charity, the Make-a-Wish Foundation.

Shareef & Father Al Malnik with Friends

Shareef & Father Al Malnik with Friends

The Malnik Family

The Malnik Family

Nancy Malnik And Guests

Nancy Malnik And Guests

Nancy Malnik And Friends
The Malnik Home

The Malnik Home

Malnik and his wife Nancy welcomed the likes of: middleweight boxing world champ Bernard Hopkins; designers Richie Rich and Baby Chic (don’t ask); Bernie Madoff victim Jerome Fisher (who’s rumored to have “lost” $150 million); liquor mogul Harvey Chaplin; Mel Harris, former CEO of AIG, and his wife Fran; and others.

The party was poolside at Malnik’s 38,000-square-foot beachfronter, and not too many will blame him for not leaving folks outside. His place, appraised by the property appraiser’s office at a deceivingly low $19.8 million, is probably worth twice as much if you factor in what’s inside.

Malnik’s basement, for example, contains an Asian art collection that includes sculpted mammoth tusks and one Chinese ivory sculpture that features 8,000 different characters, all with a different face.

Next year, Malnik plans to move his rarely seen collection in the 18,000-square-foot  manse he’s building next door — “Something with a nice rec room for the kids,” he says.

Photos by Michele Sandberg

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Nat King Cole Generation Hope – Chaired by Alvin & Nancy Malnik

Posted by Alvin Malnik on June 05, 2009
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MIAMI BEACH, Fla.,  — Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc., a non-profit foundation to benefit music education in South Florida schools, kicked off with an elegant Gala at The Forge in Miami Beach on November 29.  The foundation was established by the Cole twins, Timolin and Casey of Boca Raton, the youngest daughters of music legend Nat King Cole.

The Nat King Cole Generation Hope Black and White Gala was chaired by philanthropist and international financier Al Malnik and his wife Nancy Malnik.  The Forge, a Miami Beach restaurant and bar, has served as the institution of elegance and taste and was founded by Al Malnik in 1968.  The historic landmark and American icon has been the home of great music events throughout the years including performances by Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis Jr.

The Gala featured star-studded entertainment including performances by Grammy-winning, Oscar-nominated producer songwriter Siedah Garrett and 11 time Grammy-nominated songwriter and producer Dennis Lambert.  Melanie Fiona, an artist with SRC Records, dazzled guests with “The Midnight Train to Georgia.”  Marie Petticar, talented a senior from Miramar High School, serenaded guests as well.

The event was emceed by Willard Shepard of NBC Miami.  Celebrity guests included Kyle MacLachlan of “Desperate Housewives,” and his wife Desiree Gruber, producer of “Project Runway,” Niche Media CEO Jason, Binn, and celebrity rappers Cool and Dre.  The Cole twins were joined by their mother, Mrs. Nat King Cole, their husbands, Gary Augustus and Julian Hooker, and friends from Florida, California and around the country.

The Gala sponsors included Al and Nancy Malnik, Madelyn Savarick, UNUM, Goldman Sachs, USI, Excel Services, Lincoln Financial, United Healthcare, The Fountainbleau, Chocolit, designer Paul Rubin, Saks, Guava Media, Ellis and Lisa Jones, Guy and Lee Ann Mancini, and Denise and Jordan Zimmerman.

The evening kicked off with a silent auction in The Forge’s famed wine room with a lively cocktail hour featuring entertainment by DJ Irie, a 2007 BET Award nominee and winner of Miami New Times’ 2005 Best Club DJ.  Designer Rubin Singer showed his creations during an informal fashion show and he dressed the Cole twins in black and white Grecian-style gowns.

Following the cocktail party, guests proceeded into the black and white themed ballroom for dinner and an intimate concert.  Guests then danced and continued the party at the Glass Bar at The Forge for the official after party.

The Cole twins launched the Foundation after learning of budget cuts in South Florida public schools.  The Foundation was created to provide funding for music education to children of all ages, ethnic backgrounds and diversities, including music instrument instruction, music composition and songwriting, technical instruction in the recording arts,  music instruments and equipment, and music related seminars and field trips.

“We were thrilled by the tremendous support from our friends and the South Florida community and the funds raised will help music programs in South Florida schools,” said Timolin Cole.  “By enriching students with the opportunity to enhance their musical talents and abilities, our father’s legacy lives on.”

Casey Cole added, “We will continue with fundraising efforts over the next 12 months and are working with school officials in Palm Beach, Miami-Dade and Broward Counties to determine where the funds are most needed.”

Nat King Cole was one of the most popular singers ever to hit the American charts. A brilliant recording and concert artist during the 40s, 50s, and 60s, he attracted millions of fans around the world with a sensitive and caressing singing voice that was unmistakable. Cole had a rare blend of technical musical knowledge and sheer performing artistry topped off with an abundance of showmanship. In the 23 years that he recorded with Capitol Records, he turned out hit after amazing hit – nearly 700 songs – all the while managing to remain a gentle, tolerant and gracious human being.

In 1965, Nat King Cole died tragically of lung cancer. He was only 45. Nathaniel Adams Coles was born in Montgomery, Alabama on March 17, 1919. He was the son of Baptist minister, Edward James Coles, and mother, Perlina Adams, who sang soprano and directed the choir in her husband’s church. Cole grew up in Chicago, met and married a girl in New York named Maria Hawkins, who was from Boston. They had five children and lived in Hancock Park in Los Angeles.

NKC Generation Hope, Inc. has been established as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization in South Florida.  Its officers are Timolin and Casey Cole, both of Boca Raton.  Honorary Board Members are:  Mrs. Nat King Cole of Ponte Vedre, Fla.; Ms. Natalie Cole and Ms. Carole Cole, both of Los Angeles; Ms. Madelyn Savarick of Boca Raton; Mr. Jimmy Cefalo of Pittston, Pennsylvania; Mr. Colin Cowie of Los Angeles; Mr. Anthony C. Gruppo of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida; Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Jones of Los Angeles; Ms. Leslie Linder of West Palm Beach; Mr. and Mrs. Al Malnik of Palm Beach; Ms. Marylynne Stephan McGlone of Palm Beach; Ms.Holly Robinson and Mr. Rodney Peete, both of Los Angeles, and Mr. and Mrs. Jordan Zimmerman also of Boca Raton.

To obtain more information on Nat King Cole Generation Hope, Inc., please visit: www.natkingcolefoundation.org

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Make-A-Wish 14th Annual Ball – Alvin & Nancy Malnik

Posted by Alvin Malnik on March 10, 2009
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Amidst the glamour and dazzle of the 14th Annual InterContinental Miami Make-A-Wish Ball one thing was clear – each and every guest attending the event was there for the children.

And Boca Raton residents Alvin and Nancy Malnik are no exception.  Their continued support for the Make-a-Wish Foundation of Southern Florida is just one of the many ways the couple shows that when it comes to helping children, charity comes from the heart.

“This is about the children and doing everything possible to make a difference in their lives,” said Alvin Malnik.  “When you see a child smile and realize how much these wishes mean to them, you know that you’ve got to help.”

The November 8, 2008 event, which raised $1.6 million, featured a mystical-themed dinner, musical performance by The Honey Brothers, and an extravagant live auction emceed by reality television star Kim Kardashian.

Event committee members Norm Wedderbum, president and chief executive officer of the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Southern Florida; Gala Host and InterContinental Miami General Manager, Jack Miller; and event chairman Shareef Malnik proprietor of The Forge joined together to honor Alvin and Nancy Malnik’s pledge of continued support as lifetime benefactors for the organization.

Wish benefactor James Ferraro, grand benefactors Stanley and Gala Cohen, founding benefactors Howard and Barbara Glicken, and corporate benefactor Robert Press of Trafalgar Capital Advisors were also honored during the event.

Following the ball, Shareef Malnik and Michael Capponi lead the celebration of the evening’s success by turning the Chopin Ballroom into the InterContinental Miami Make-A-Wish Nightclub.  Kim Kardashian and The Honey Brothers also joined in to host the venue featuring a fashion show by designer Richie Rich and a performance by New York cult-favorite Tokyo Diiva.

Both Al and Nancy Malnik enjoyed the glamorous and entertaining evening and say their focus and commitment to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the children their programs help, runs deep.  “We’re honored to be involved with and contribute to the success of this wonderful organization.”

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Dana-Farber Gets 1 Million From The Malnik Family

Posted by Alvin Malnik on November 18, 2008
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Al and Nancy Malnik saw firsthand the quality of Dana-Farber’s expertise when their son, Jarod, was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and their subsequently turned to Dana-Farber’s Chief of Staff Stephen E. Sallan, MD, for consultation on his treatment.

Three years later, Jarod is in remission and the Malniks, inspired by this experience, have given $1 million to establish the Al and Nancy Malnik Family AML Research Fund at Dana-Farber under the direction of Dr. Sallan.

“Nancy and I feel privileged that our son was the recipient of the most caring and

Wondrous advice that anyone could possibly receive,” said Al Melnik. “With this gift, we hope to further the research for AML cures while also honoring the unbelievable relationship Dr. Sallan has with all his patients.”

This gift will alson provide critical support to Mission Possible: The Dana-Farber Campaign to Conquer Cancer. This $1 billion fundraising initiative, of which$450 million is designated specifically for research and care, will help the Institute’s scientists find more effective therapies for diseases, such as AML, and save even more patient’s lives. Attacking the disease at it core

AML is a disease that starts in the bone marrow and often moves into the blood. The bone marrow cells do not develop correctly and, as a result, clog the bone marrow and circulation.
Dr. Sallan has organized a team, headed by Scott Armstrong, MD, PhD, who have found that leukemia stem cells—a small number of self renewing cells within a tumor are likely responsible for maintaining AML and, therefore, may represent highly relevant targets for anti-leukemia therapies. With this gift, they are pursuing several studies focused on defining the stem cell that provide the basis for the disease’s generation and persistence, which will enable them to further identify how AML evolves.

Investigators can also build off this knowledge to develop new treatment methods, while lessening potential side effects and focusing on the growing importance of many quality-of life issues. Dana-Farber researchers, including Kimberly Stegmaier, MD, and Todd Golub, MD, are focused on identifying already approved drugs that can target AML stem cells and abnormally-activated, cancer-causing genes.

Often, rare diseases such as AML, do not receive as much attention from industry as more common cancers. As such, this gift will dramatically influence the drug discovery and clinical trials process and, ultimately, improve survival rates for patients with this terrible disease.

“The Malnik family’s generosity allows us to establish an AML focused research effort, which has the potential to affect patients everywhere with this disease,” said Sallan. “We are moving in a truly revolutionary direction which will ultimately result in saving more patients lives and improving their quality of life.”

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